Software in this category are no longer available (at least I couldn’t find them) or don’t run on Windows 10. If you have a computer running an older Windows flavor (pre-Windows 7), you may be able to use them… granted that you find them first. The following notes were written more than ten years ago, so they are as old as the software they describe. Do not take them as current and valid, except when they indicate the program no longer runs in Windows or is no longer available.

 

camusCellular Automata Music Generator (CAMUS) ~ v2.0
OS: Win9x/Me
author: Glasgow University Centre for Music Technology, Tim Conrardy.
url: http://tamw.atari-users.net
CAMUS is based on a program originally created by Eduardo Reck Miranda in 1991 for the Atari computer. This Win9x version employs the cellular automata algorithm to generate musical notes using two parallel windows: the Game of Life, and the Demon Cyclic Space. The software is no longer available (Mr. Conrardy, its maintainer, passed away in 2009). An Atari computer version is available in the url.
Last revision: 1997.


Fractal HarmoniesFractal Harmonies ~ v1.1
OS: Win9x/Me/NT/2000
author: Stefanie Blain and Jason Montojo
url: n/a
Fractal Harmonies combines image creation with music composition in a very easy way. It can compose musical tunes from Mandelbrot and Julia set fractals. It comes with several tools and options to control your compositions. Both the melody and the image can be saved. It seems it’s no longer available.
Last revision: 15 March 2000.


Fractal Music ~ v1.9
OS: Win9x/Me
author: David H. Singer
url: http://www.fractal-vibes.com
The Fractal Music combines Lindenmayer System fractals with Cellular Automata to compose 5-voice fractal music. You can select note durational patterns, scales and subset of the scale, and control how CA cell-state changes map to MIDI events. I haven’t tested it in Windows 10 yet.
Last revision: 2000.


FractMusFractMus
OS:
Win9x/Me/NT/Vista/Win 7
author: Gustavo Díaz-Jerez
url: http://www.gustavodiazjerez.com
FractMus is a powerful algorithmic music application that can generate fully controlled compositions as well as random samplings from mathematical formulas (Morse-Thue, Logistic Map, 1/f noise, Henon, Hopalong, Martin, Gingerbread man and Lorenz algorithms). Some background in music could be of help for the user. This version adds some new algorithms, password protection for *.fms files, the ability to save individual events, and better documentation. Source code available under the GPL license. The program is not compatible with Windows 8 or 10.
Last revision: 05 October 1999.


Gingerbread Gingerbread ~ v3.0
OS: Win9x/Me/NT/XP/Vista
author: Phil Thompson
url: http://www.fractal-vibes.com
Once again, Phil is offering his old fractal music software collection “as is”: he will no longer give support, so users will download, install and use at their own risk. Available are two versions of Gingerbread (2.0 and 3.0). According to many fractal music experts, Gingerbread is one of the most (if not the most) powerful fractal music generation software ever created. Version 2.0 requires a freely available registration code (visit Phil’s web site, fractalmusician.com, to get it), while version 3.0 requires no registration at all. NOTE: Those were my iriginal notes, current until 2006. Right now, only Gingerbread 2.0 is still available through Fractal Vibes website (the url above). Alas, it’s not compatible with Window 10.
Last revision: 2002.


LMUSe ~ v0.7b
OS: DOS/JAVA
author: David Sharp
url: http://www.oocities.org
LMUSe will convert L System fractals into musical compositions. Both images (GIF) and sound (MID or parameters) can be save. It is designed for DOS, but will run on Windows 9x without any problem. Actually, it’s one of the most user-friendly DOS programs I’ve seen. There’s also a new Java version on its web site, with some improvements. This last one requires the Java 1.3 JRE (or later) installed on your system (available separately from www.sun.com or some other jave-enable software).
Last revision: 24 December 1998 / 22 June 2001.